curbi for School-aged Children

The recommended amount of screen time for children aged 5 to 18 years of age is a maximum of two hours per day.  This includes time spent watching TV, or using any other screen such as the computer. Just as you would have simple safety rules for children regarding going to a friends house and what time they need to be home, these rules are important when your child starts using a computer, particularly if you are not able to be sitting with them or supervising them.

Children of this age begin to want increased social activities and are interested in expanding relationships other than with their parents. They also begin to be influenced by other adults such as teachers. They like to feel capable and are keen to show you their new skills. At this age, children can be really interested in computer games, and if you are interested, they will be happy to show you what they like to play. Developmentally they need to be guided by some simple safety rules but may at times forget these rules.  Also, the pull to have increased contact and friendships separate to their parents may make it difficult for them to be self-limiting with their computer use.

Parents need to help monitor what sites their child is visiting, and for how long.  Parents can use this information to talk to their child about time spent online, and to be interested in what their child enjoys doing.  The information that curbi collects provides an opportunity for parents to enquire whether their child has any issues or is having any problems relating to their online usage.  

References

Green, L., Brady, D., Olafsson, K., Hartley, J., and Lumby, C. Risk and safety for Australian children on the internet.

Pitman, S. August, 2008.  The impact of media technologies on child development and wellbeing.

Royal Australasian College of Physicians (RACP), 2004.  Children and the Media: Advocating for the future. 

Raising Children Network. The Australian Parenting Network.  https://raisingchildren.net.au/articles/vic_services.html/context/1013

Source

Vivid Psychology